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Tournament of Books, Round One: Strange the Dreamer vs Upside of Unrequited

Tournament of Books, Round One: Strange the Dreamer vs Upside of Unrequited

The two books I read were Strange the Dreamer by Laini Taylor and The Upside of Unrequited by Becky Albertalli. Both of these books have been on my radar, so I’m glad I had an excuse to read them. I was obsessed with the Daughter of Smoke and Bone trilogy by Taylor, and I adored Simon vs. The Homosapiens Agenda by Albertalli. I couldn’t wait to dive into these and devour them.

Devour them I did.


Strange the Dreamer by Laini Taylor

strange the dreamerStrange the Dreamer follows an orphan, Lazlo Strange, who ran away from the monks he was staying with and found himself in the library. Lazlo became a librarian, as one does, with an obsession of this distant city that he can’t remember the name. It’s right on the tip of his tongue, but it seems to have been erased from his, and everyone else’s, memory. The only name that comes out is “Weep”. Lazlo becomes enamoured with everything to do with Weep. He studies the origins, the folk tales, and even teaches himself the language. Lazlo forever stays in the library, until the day he doesn’t.

The Godslayer, a mysterious warrior, comes from the city of Weep searching for philosophers, mathematicians, alchemists, all of the greatest that neighboring cities have to offer. He’s looking for the best of the best to go back with him and solve a problem. What the problem is, these recruits do not know. They’ve been promised they will know once they look upon the city. Lazlo is one of the lucky few who embark on this journey.

Pros:

  • Taylor’s writing borders purple prose, which might turn some people off. However; it’s pretty poetic and beautifully written
  • Build-up is amazing
  • Insane character development
Cons:

  • Pretty hefty book, with over 500 pages.
  • Was not aware that this was a first in a two-book series, so now I have to wait to see what happens
  • Might be written with a tad too much detail for people who are not interested, and want more action throughout

The Upside of Unrequited by Becky Albertalli

upsideThe Upside of Unrequited brings us back to reality with a realistic, contemporary, fiction. Molly Peskin-Suso and her twin sister, Cassie, are both trying to figure out love and dating. Cassie has had no problems getting girls to notice her. She’s the life of the party, the outgoing, confident, one. Molly is the more reserved twin, who has had 26 crushes with no partner as a result – not even a kiss.

Things get a little crazy once a new girl enters Cassie’s life. Molly is trying to come out of her shell, put herself out there. There’s a super cute hipster she has her eye on, but then there’s this guy she works with who is obsessed with all things Game of Thrones and Lord of the Rings. She can’t have crushes on both at the same time, can she? Maybe it’s something more; maybe these crushes will be the ones that turn into something more than a crush.

 

Pros:

  • Positive character and portrayal of a heavier girl
  • LGBTQ characters who are not stereotypical
  • Characters of color represented who are not stereotypical
Cons:

  • Molly bases a lot of her self-worth on what others, specifically boys, think about her
  • Super boy-crazy – if you’re into that, then it’s all good. If you’re not, there’s an overwhelming amount of obsessing.
  • This is a tad bit dated, even though it came out in 2017. Teens don’t use Facebook; there were a couple other dated references that I found as well. (Yes, it’s a super minor thing.)

As I’m sitting here, I’m still having a hard time picking which one to move on in the bracket. I enjoyed both of them, though they had their issues.

And the winner is…

strange the dreamer.jpg

Strange the Dreamer by Laini Taylor

I think I’m going to have to go with Strange the Dreamer. While it is a bigger book, and stylized, I couldn’t get over Molly’s obsession with boys and being in a relationship. I would have preferred if Molly discovered herself and realized she doesn’t need a partner to validate who she is. There were a few “awww” moments, but I had a hard time looking past the superficial need to be with someone. It’s important for teens to know they don’t have to have a partner before they exit high school; it doesn’t make them more or less of a person.

Strange the Dreamer is simply beautiful. Taylor is a poetic writer with the ability to transport you to a different world without feeling like the rug has been pulled from under your feet. I love all of the character developments, and felt a connection with them, including the side characters. I was just so involved and wrapped up in this story. It’s adventure, fantasy, love, revenge, loss, all the things you’re looking for in a hard-to-put-down book. The characters are dynamic and interesting, the plot held my attention, and the build-up was epic, and I am super psyched for the next installment.



Megan is a Teen Services Advisor at the Arlington Heights Memorial Library. When she’s not studying for her Masters in Library Science at the University of Alabama or working, she’s either working out or binge watching Netflix.

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Posted by on February 5, 2018 in Tournament of Books

 

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Tournament of Books, Round One: Turtles All the Way Down vs They Both Die at the End

Tournament of Books, Round One: Turtles All the Way Down vs They Both Die at the End

I read Turtles All the Way Down first, and about a quarter way through They Both Die at the End I was ready to give Turtles the victory. It took me awhile to get into They Both Die at the End; Mateo annoyed me, his fight with himself to actually leave his apartment dragged, and Rufus’s connection to the Plutos (the friends/family he’s made in his foster home) felt flat. But sometimes sticking with a book pays off.


Turtles All the Way Down by John Green

turtles.jpgIn Turtles All the Way Down by John Green we are introduced to Aza, who gets lost/trapped by the spiral of her own thoughts (which quite frequently have to do with how likely it is that she might have contracted clostridium difficile). There’s a missing billionaire, and her best-friend Daisy convinces Aza that they need to go talk to his son, Davis, because Aza has a vague childhood connection to him.  Aza and Daisy do meet the billionaire’s son (and learn that said billionaire is leaving his entire fortune to an obscure lizard), but this book is not a mystery and any detective work is half-hearted at best. The book is more about what is going on in Aza’s head than what is going on in the world around her. She’s struggling with OCD and invasive (I think the correct medical term was intrusive, but Aza calls them invasive) thoughts that repeatedly remind her of all the microbes she already has and what could be working its way inside her (and possibly giving her C.diff) – and thoughts like that make it really hard to enjoy kissing someone. Aza knows these thoughts are not rational, and she tries through therapy and medication (which she takes almost every day) to keep them at bay, but it doesn’t always feel like she is the one in control, and if’ she’s not in control of her thoughts, what makes her Aza. Green does an excellent job of immersing the reader in Aza’s though spirals, making you feel that yes, Aza needs to go check that band aid one more time, even though you know (as does she) that it will be fine if she doesn’t.


They Both Die at the End by Adam Silvera

tbdateThey Both Die at the End by Adam Silvera is at least devoid of spoilers, the outcome is in the title. When done well though, knowing what will happen doesn’t stop the reader from shedding a few tears (if they’re the type that does that sort of thing) when it comes to pass. Both Mateo and Rufus receive calls from Death Cast in the early morning hours, letting them know by the end of the day they will be dead. Mateo gets his call while sitting safely in his room (to be fair it is the middle of the night) and Rufus receives his while beating up the guy dating his ex-girlfriend. These two begin their last day as strangers and through the Last Friend App their lives come together. Their friendship starts off a bit stiff and awkward (Rufus basically has to force Mateo to leave his apartment and when Mateo finds out Rufus is wanted by the police he’s ready to bolt), which, considering they just met, is more than reasonable. Once Rufus and Mateo fell into a rhythm together though, the book came alive. I’m not usually a fan of the insta-relationship (although I did thoroughly enjoy The Sun is Also a Star so maybe with the right writer and set of circumstances it does work well), but with their deaths on the horizon, throwing themselves into something more fully and with fewer inhibitions works. By the end, their deaths definitely packed an emotional punch (there were some tears). Despite the semi-fantastical premise the book is more about the details of life and human connection.


And the winner is…

tbdate

They Both Die at the End

They Both Die at the End by Adam Silvera. Part of me still wants the winner to be Aza and her thought spirals, but when Silvera’s book ended I had a hard time pulling myself back to the real world. I kept rehashing and going back to Mateo’s and Rufus’s last moments, wondering about the power behind Death Cast and the gift/curse that being aware of your last day can be.



Lisa Fisherkeller Barefield is the Teen Services Supervisor at Wheaton Public Library. She’s always looking for new places to travel (real world and fictional/fantastical), regularly finds herself dancing to the music in her head, and considers herself to be a French fry connoisseur (to date Belgian fries dipped in mayonnaise are her favorite).

 

 
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Posted by on February 5, 2018 in Tournament of Books

 

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Tournament of Books, Round One: Moxie vs Piecing Me Together

Tournament of Books, Round One: Moxie vs Piecing Me Together

My two books, Moxie by Jennifer Mathieu and Piecing Me Together by Renee Watson, are both very different, yet very similar. Moxie is about a white girl in a privileged town who is fed up with the politics of her high school, while Piecing Me Together is told by a poor African American teen desperate to escape her neighborhood and find a better life for herself and her family. However, both are realistic fiction and the basis of both stories is woman’s empowerment and feminism.


Moxie by Jennifer Mathieu

moxieLet’s talk about Moxie first. It isn’t often you come across a book with such a strong female character. Viv is fed up with her school and especially the principal. Fed up with the sexist dress codes, sexual harassment, and a football team that can do no wrong (it has the best of everything, including equipment and uniforms). One night instead of going to the football game (in which the entire town literally shuts down), she single-handedly creates the Moxie zine. Moxie unites all the girls in the school and encourages them to fight back. It takes off like rapid fire and soon the Moxie group is formed. This book is fun and entertaining while providing a great lesson in feminism. I feel this book will empower many teen readers. It is definitely a feel good book and an inspiration to all.


Piecing Me Together by Renee Watson

piecingmetogetherIn Piecing Me Together, Jade is one of the few African American students in a privileged high school which she attends on scholarship. She has few friends and desperately seeks the opportunity to travel abroad. She knows it is her only way out of her poor neighborhood. Instead she gets selected to be in a “woman-to-woman” group where she is paired with a mentor, Maxine. Although this seems to be a great opportunity, Maxine isn’t very emotionally stable herself. Jade’s determination and learning along with Maxine makes this a powerful book. They both teach each other a lot about the outside world. Watson’s focus is on teaching the reader that you create your own future and that empowerment and standing up for oneself is as important as the opportunities one may receive.


And the winner is…

moxie

Moxie by Jennifer Mathieu

While I enjoyed both books very much and both are well written, Moxie shows a stronger character from the beginning and has more facets to the book, including humor. I loved how the actual zines she creates are included in the book. This enhances the entertainment and feel of empowerment throughout the book. Both books could be used in the classroom to teach students to speak up for themselves and others, but I feel Moxie would reach a wider audience and is more entertaining. Therefore, I think Moxie by Jennifer Mathieu should go on to the next round.

Moxie Girls Fight Back!!!



Heather Stewart is the Young Adult Librarian at Johnsburg Public Library. She enjoys getting crazy with her snarky teens, being brutally honest at times, but warm fuzzies are definitely her thing.  In her spare time, she enjoys board games, 80’s bands and spending time with her family, especially her 2 year old grandson, Elliott. However, she is an Ambivert and will never pass up on a solo lunch date with a good book.
 
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Posted by on February 5, 2018 in Tournament of Books

 

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Tournament of Books, Round One: We Are Okay vs The Epic Crush of Genie Lo

Tournament of Books, Round One: We Are Okay vs The Epic Crush of Genie Lo

We Are Okay by Nina LaCour

weareokayI first read We Are Okay over the summer while narrowing down a list of Mock Printz titles.  It’s a very good book. It deals with depression, love, mental illness and suicide.  Marin has left for college and she has chose to completely close the door on that part of her life.  She doesn’t want to confront what happened to her grandpa and how she may have missed all the signs. She doesn’t want to dwell on her relationship with her best friend that turned in something much more at the end of the summer either.  Since leaving for school Marin has slowly carved out a new life for herself carefully protecting everything in her past so it doesn’t surface again.

Except now it’s winter break and Mabel, her best friend is coming for a visit.  Marin wants to keep everything hidden. She wants to continue the routine she’s developed to keep everything moving in her life.  But, when a snowstorm somewhat strands them, Marin may be forced to confront what she fears most.   We Are Okay is accessible with quick chapters,  it deftly handles the issues it raises.


The Epic Crush of Genie Lo by F C Yee

genieloOn a completely different note- super powers, hilarity, demon spawn and Chinese mythology make  The Epic Crush of Genie Lo a kickass book.  Genie is busting her butt trying to get into a great college and get out the community she lives in outside on San Francisco.  Everything is going to plan until Quentin shows up and strange things start to happen, like demons arriving and the possibility the whole city will be destroyed.

Here’s the abridged version; turns out Quentin is actually the Monkey King and Genie is the Monkey King’s former all powerful weapon, the Ruyi Jingu Bang, reincarnated as a human.  Of course this takes Genie some time to wrap her head around.  Turns out being the Ruyi Jingu Bang also means she has awesome super powers. Since the Ruyi Jingu Bang, is incredibly powerful everyone is after Genie because they want to harness her power.  Genie has no interest in belonging to someone else.  Genie and Quentin begin to train together, because of those aforementioned demons.  There are over 100 demons that have escaped from hell and Genie and Quention need to take them all down to save the day. Note – that is not a simple task.  While all that is going on Genie is still trying to manage her day to day life including applying for colleges, friendships, crushes and her divorced parents.  She has her hands full to say the least.


And the winner is…

genielo

The Epic Crush of Genie Lo by F C Yee

I loved The Epic Crush of Genie Lo because it’s unique, has a strong female lead, uses pieces from Chinese mythology, has a lot of humor and is always engaging.  We Are Okay is a good book too, but I feel I have read it before in other forms and variations.  The issues raised in We Are Okay are important for sure, but it’s not a book that really stuck with me like The Epic Crush of Genie Lo has.   I love the fact that Genie Lo has almost all non white cast. It was new, fresh, and fun.  (Yes some of you might be thinking there are other action pack mythology books out there, but I promise you this book by really stands out).  It makes me laugh to myself when I think about it and it’s a book I want to share with all the teens I work with.  The Epic Crush of Genie Lo was the pick me up book I needed this past year.



Besides overseeing teen services at Evanston Public Library, Renee Neumeier enjoys stuffing her face with macarons, wrangling her 3 year old, drinking copious amounts of tea, and tromping around Chicago looking for macarons (and sometimes cupcakes).
 
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Posted by on February 5, 2018 in Tournament of Books

 

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Tournament of Books, Round One: Far From the Tree vs Spinning

Tournament of Books, Round One: Far From the Tree vs Spinning

Far From the Tree by Robin Benway

farfromthetreeI was really excited when I found out what books I’d been assigned. I’ve wanted to read Far from the Tree by Robin Benway because I was a fan of her previous book, Emmy & Oliver, as well as because of all the buzz surrounding her National Book Award win. 16-year-old Grace, after recently giving her baby up for adoption, decides that she now wants to meet her own adoptive mother. While her information isn’t available, she does find out that she has two other half-siblings from the same mother – snarky Maya, who was adopted by wealthy parents now dealing with marital issues and alcoholism, and quiet, sensitive Joaquin, her older brother who’s been bouncing around the foster system his whole life. They all agree to meet, and become a support network for one another as they deal with break ups and parental issues and new crushes. Benway is always great at creating conflicts without clear villains, and she has a vast reservoir of empathy for all of her characters, even when they make less-than-ideal decisions. This book is going to be a go-to recommendation for readers of realistic fiction.


Spinning by Tillie Walden

spinningSpinning is a graphic memoir by Tillie Walden about her youth spent in competitive figure skating and coming out as queer. She changes cities, falls in and out of friendships, has wonderful and terrible adult role models, and a lot of  other incidents that don’t quite make a clear and concise narrative, but perfectly encapsulate how disparate moments are strung together in our memory to record our lives. Even when it’s not about Tillie dealing with her emerging identity, it’s still about the performative nature of her sport and all the gendered expectations that come with it. It’s easily my among my favorite comics of 2017.

The art is spare, doing much of the emotional heavy lifting, with purple coloring and spare but stark bursts of yellow. The style really evokes This One Summer for me, with the coloring shifted slightly. Where Summer’s detailing is lush and vibrant, though, Spinning is often as vast and cold as an empty ice rink.


And the winner is…

spinning

Spinning by Tillie Walden

Author/actor John Hodgman often says “Specificity is the soul of narrative,” and that best explains how I chose a winner between the two books. Spinning feels so authentic. I’m not a queer teen who figure skates, but Walden gives so many specifics that she created a beautiful window into that world, while also accurately mirroring my own experiences with parental difficulties, never feeling fully part of a friend group, or feeling the drive to excel at something I’m not even really enjoying anymore. Conversely, Far from the Tree has about three books worth of drama, but very little forward momentum in plot. (The middle third feels like a lot of wheel spinning.) The characters are also fairly generic, without the room to breathe and be authentic. There are some specific quirks – dipping their fries in mayo, for instance – but so much of these kids and their lives feel like rough sketches. Combine that with the fairly manipulative and cliched nature of all various drama the teens go through in Far From the Tree, and we have a clear winner.



Evan Mather is a Teen Services Librarian at Mount Prospect Public Library. He loves cooking, movies, and DMing. When he’s not working, you can usually find him trying to make his two cats to get along.

 
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Posted by on February 5, 2018 in Tournament of Books

 

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Tournament of Books, Round One: City of Saints and Thieves vs Warcross

Tournament of Books, Round One: City of Saints and Thieves vs Warcross
City of Saints and Thieves by Natalie C Anderson
Natalie C. Anderson’s City of Saints and Thieves is a unique read to say the least. When I first stumble  upon this book when  I was researching new books for purchase, I was intrigued by the premise because I had not seen anything like it.

33956433City of Saints and Thieves is a blend of a lot of genres that takes the readers on an intriguing ride. The story follows Tina and her mother who are both refugees from the Congo and have come all this way to seek a better life in Kenya. Tina’s mother finds employment as a maid for a powerful business Mr. Greyhill whose meddling in corruption and crime make him one of the most hated men in Kenya. It’s these allegations against Mr. Greyhill that makes Tina suspicious when she finds out that her mother has been murdered. It is after the death of her mother that Tina  decides to join the Goondas, a prolific gang  with hopes that it will help her seek revenge. Tina becomes a skilled thief and learns to live on her own in the streets. Slowly plotting her revenge towards Mr. Greyhill, Tina runs into the painful tidbits of her past that slows her plans. Without giving anything away, the story takes the reader into many twists and turns . We learn that there is more to the murder than meets the eye.

After reading the book, it’s definitely not The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo meets Gone Girl (sorry Goodreads). But rather its the girl with the dragon tattoo mixed with every other book in the world on mystery. I personally wouldn’t give this book to my middle grader readers, but a high schooler that is tired of reading the typical YA book. I was a huge fan of the writing style

Warcross by Marie Lu
29385546Warcross by Marie Lu introduces the reader to the virtual reality of Warcross. In the same light of Ready Player One and Tron Legacy, Warcross is set in a post apocalyptic world where people are desperate to find somewhere to escape. They find solace in the world of Warcross, a virtual reality that is accessible through virtual reality goggles and those lucky enough are able to compete in the International Warcross Championship. Emika Chen is an orphan and a bounty hunter, who tracks down those that illegally bet on the game. She also happens to be a talented hacker that is quickly able to hack into Warcross, but she is afraid of what happens if the creators and regulators of Warcross find out. She is already on the edge because money is tight and money that she makes from bounty hunting and working at the diner are not enough to cover the rent. Emika also continues to be overtaken by memories of her father. Knowing that eviction and discovery is imminent, Emika is contacted by Hideo the creator of Warcross with an offer. Hideo needs Emika to serve as a spy for him inside the game. Now inside the game, Emika finds out that Warcross is full of threats that can impact Warcross as a whole. It’s Emika’s job to find a solution.
Unlike the City of Saint and Thieves, Marie Lu’s Warcross takes you on the ride of a lifetime. I was able to imagine the world of Warcross in my mind where technology and modernity intersect, but that still has a habit of leaving those with less behind. It’s a high stakes adventure that is similar to other Marie Lu books. I liked this book so much that I put this title on our Great New Reads for Teens book list in the fall, and our middle schoolers loved it as well.

And the winner is…
29385546

Warcross by Marie Lu

City of Saints and Thieves and Warcoss both have strong female characters that are playing on tragedies that happened to them. They are both anxious to find solutions to different issues, but their combined determination, bravery, and let’s face it stubbornness puts these two lead characters at the top. If I had to choose the best of the two, I would say Warcross hits the ball out of the park. It’s versatile, it’s full of adventure, and it’s Marie Lu. Of course Warcross doesn’t beat the Legend series or The Young Elites series, but it’s still a noteworthy title that even fans that don’t typically read science fiction are going to enjoy.


Melisa is a Youth and Young Adult Librarian at Hinsdale Public Library that specializes in teen services. When she isn’t reading, you can find her in a hot yoga class or watching animals do funny things on Instagram. 
 
 
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Posted by on January 29, 2018 in Tournament of Books

 

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Tournament of Books, Round One: Dear Martin v The Librarian of Auschwitz

Tournament of Books, Round One: Dear Martin v The Librarian of Auschwitz

When I said I would participate in this I was only a few months pregnant. Now I’m about 2-3 weeks from having this baby and I’ve been given two extremely emotionally charged books to review and choose between (Thanks for that J). So as I am reading the books I am hoping that I don’t burst into tears with my emotions on high alert. I have avoided reading emotionally charged books this entire pregnancy and now have to face them in my final month. So if I get a little overly emotional in my reviews I apologize ahead of time. Also fair warning there are some spoilers here, but I never give away the big endings.

 


Dear Martin by Nic Stone

9781101939499Justyce McAllister is one of the best in his class at Braselton Prep. He is even on the debate team and set to go to YALE next year. But Justyce is from a single parent home, he is black, and originally from the bad side of town. So when a police officer sees him in a hoodie with a drunk girl late at night trying to get her into a car, the police officer already assumes that Justyce is up to no good. Justyce finds himself sprawled on the ground in handcuffs with ringing ears, all for trying to help his drunk ex-girlfriend home so she wouldn’t try to drive drunk. The officer wouldn’t let him explain and Justyce was left in handcuffs for hours while everything was worked out. This incident stirs something inside of Justyce. As a way to cope with what he is going through he decides to write letters to Martin Luther King Jr. and aspire to be more like him. At school, one of his classes has started talking about race and if all things are truly created equal. A few of the white guys in the group start talking about how everything is and this spurs them to do and say things that are completely racist as a way to prove that all things are equal. At first Justyce and his half black friend Manny just take it with a grain of salt, but after several incidents on the news of innocent black teens being shot, arrested or killed by police, Justyce can’t take it anymore. Soon Manny can’t either. And then while the two boys are out for a drive, trying to take their mind off their once friend who is filing a lawsuit against Manny for punching him out after racist comments, tragedy strikes.

Race issues are always going to be a thing and are always going to come up, especially with teens in diverse populations. After all the issues in the news that have happened in the last few years, it’s fairly obvious that we can say that this book has come at the right time. This is the type of book that can gut punch you and make you think about everything more seriously. While reading this I was thinking of my cousins biracial kids in St. Louis and many of the teens I have worked with over the last 10 years in the suburbs of Chicago. It also brought up many conversations I had in college with my philosophy professor Dr. Washington. This book hit me hard as I read it and when I came to the end of the book I felt like I had come full circle with the story. It is defiantly a book that everyone should read. And while I frown upon some of the language used in the book, I understand why it is in there.


The Librarian of Auschwitz by Antonio Iturbe

LibrarianAuschwitz_JKT_FINAL.inddDita was asked to be the secret librarian of Block 31 of the Auschwitz concentration camp by the leader of the Jewish people inside the Block. Block 31 housed the school. To be found with a book of any kind is a sure fire way to be executed on the spot. As she was a young pre-teen she was less likely to be suspected during inspections. She was extremely brave, albeit scared, and hid the nine books from the Nazis. As Dita grows and learns about those imprisoned with her she learns that everyone is hiding things.

Okay, so it took me a while to get up the courage to face this book. I have a thing about holocaust books ever since my grandpa told me about his experiences in WW2 (and he left a lot out of that conversation, but his emotional response to me asking him questions and his retelling of what he went through made it clear to me as a 11 year old that this was an experience that he would rather not have had). With that in mind I always approach holocaust books with reverence. I have to be in the right mindset to read them, or I can’t get through them at all. So when I started this, I kept thinking that the holocaust has been written about by so many authors in so many ways that the only way I’m going to appreciate this book is if they come at if from a different angle. By page 100 I felt I was done with reading this, and in all honesty I wanted to toss this book into a large body of water and watch as the pages bleed out into the icy cold water. The holocaust has been written about so often that there are few books that can be counted as different and extremely good. Sepetys’ Salt to the Sea or Jane Yolen’s Briar Rose are much better holocaust books in my opinion. This one skips through time with no warning so as I was reading I had to keep asking myself, is this before or after she landed in the camp? It goes into back stories of some of the other prisoners as Dita discovers their secrets and describes details of what it was like for the Jews who lived inside Auschwitz. And while I’m sure some people will find this a great read, I find it another book on the pile about a time in history that gets talked about far too much in literature, when other wars or other historic events are so often overlooked.


And the winner is….

9781101939499

Dear Martin by Nic Stone …

This is more relevant to the times and something that Teens would much rather read than another book about the Holocaust. Plus, I think it is well written and while both books are about topics that can hit you where it hurts emotionally, Dear Martin did it better with more power behind it!



Hannah Sloan – Teen Services Coordinator at the Poplar Creek Public Library District in Streamwood, IL. Hannah has been a Teen Librarian for the past nine years and has been involved in libraries in one way or another since 1997 when she signed up for the wrong club in High School. 
 
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Posted by on January 29, 2018 in Tournament of Books

 

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