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Tag Archives: Non-Fiction

Creating a Non-Fiction Collection for Teens

A lot has changed in regards to my library’s teen space & collection within the past two years. In September of 2009, a thorough weeding project made room for our newly created teen space. No longer in an awkward part of the children’s room, the teens now have their own area in the adult department. It’s full of many things that were not available (exclusively or at all) to the teens before. There’s a table! And lots of chairs! And a zine collection! And teen-created artwork on the walls! It’s pretty great.

One thing that we didn’t have, however, was a separate non-fiction collection for teens. Books that would be considered teen non-fiction were mixed in with the adult collection (although there were some juvenile non-fiction books that may have worked for teens, as well). It wasn’t until December of 2010 that we decided to create an entirely separate non-fiction collection for teens that would be housed in the teen space. I’m not exactly sure what took us so long, considering we already have graphic novels, manga, Cliffs Notes, and YA audiobooks as part of the teen collection. But I am glad we made the move!

I pulled some books from the library’s other collections & then also ordered a bunch of new items (books on health, relationships, finance, etc) to balance out the collection. I’ve been putting some of the newer, more appealing books on display (Lauren Conrad Style, the Unofficial Harry Potter Cookbook) to draw attention to this new section of the teen space. And it’s made a big difference. It seems that more teen non-fiction is being checked out, which is awesome. Now I am waiting patiently for one of our teen patrons to check out First Guitar Tutor (by Terry Burrows) & become a world famous rock star. I can’t wait!

 
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Posted by on August 4, 2011 in Articles

 

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Books to Pimp for Teen Tech Week

Back in the day before I earned my MLIS and before I even had a library career I had a LTA class on Readers’ Advisory.  The first day of class the instructor informed us that “when doing Readers Advisory you are not so much advising the reader as you are pimping the books”.  She went on to refer to her job as a “Book Pimp” (let the hilarious mental images ensue).  Now, many years later, using her terminology I give you: “Books to Pimp for Teen Tech Week”.  Going with their theme of “Mix & Mash” this post represents both fiction and non-fiction books that involve teens and technology.  Enjoy!

Ender’s Game – Orson Scott Card

Everyone should know this book, but fortunately for us new patrons are being born everyday and they have no idea about this magnificent, thought-provoking series.

Ender Wiggin is a third born child.  This is not unusual now but in the future when population is tightly controlled Ender is special.  Also, Ender at the age of 6 is still being monitored by the government.  Then comes the day that Ender’s parent fear most.  He has been chosen for Battle School (to his older brother’s horror), he is to become a solider and protect the world from the “bugs”.  Seventy years ago the bugs attacked the humans killing us without mercy, until a battle in which the bugs retreated and were never heard from again.

Ender is the youngest and smallest at battle school but it quickly becomes apparent that he is one of the best the school has ever seen.  There is talk by those in power that Ender may be the one to save us from the bugs again, except this time we are bringing the fight to them.

This book has attained classic status in the science fiction and young adult realms due to it’s engaging story and believable characters.  Orson Scott Card has created a world around Ender’s life and the series continues with Ender’s Shadow.  Listening to the audio-book  has it’s perks also (Harlan Ellison makes a guest appearance).

O’Reilly’s Brain-Friendly Guides

Greatest. Guides. EVER! These books are excellent beginner guides to web design, HTML, App Design, Algebra, Physics, and so on.  They are written in an easily digested format and interject humor where ever possible.  They are illustrated and show easy step-by-step instructions.  A very approachable text for teens with a high interest in technology and it’s applications.

Uglies – Scott Westerfeld

Tally Youngblood is going to turn sixteen and all her ugly little problems will go away. Her ugly face, gone. Her ugly body, gone. Her ugly mind, gone especially. When Tally turns sixteen she will be able to get the operation to correct every physical flaw she has. When her best friend turns sixteen and moves to New Pretty Town she figures her life is over until she becomes pretty. That is when she meets Shay who is drastically different than anyone Tally ever met. For starters she doesn’t want to become pretty which the girls will soon find out isn’t really a choice. Follow Tally on this amazing roller coaster of a novel, great for anyone in middle school and up.

The Accidental Billionaires – Ben Mezrich

This book is not a particularly hard sell.  As the inspiration for the movie The Social Network this is the story of Facebook creator Mark Zuckerberg.  A billionaire before the age of 25 a concept that will not be lost on teens, “A million dollars isn’t cool, you know what’s cool?  A billion dollars”.  This book is not without controversy though, slammed critically for the authors inability to get an interview with Zuckerberg, his liberal tweaking of the dialogue, and using Zuckerberg’s enemies for his primary source material.  All that aside the book is entertaining, fast-paced, and will be gobbled up high school teens.

Spacer and Rat – Margaret Bechard

Jack (Spacer) is a teen that has spent his entire life in space.  He and the rest of the residents of the Freedom Station refer to the earth dwellers as “rats” due to their destruction of their planet.  Then Kit (Rat) is abandoned by her father on the Freedom Station with her sentient robot, Waldo.  The robot is illegal technology that leads Jack and Kit into more trouble than they bargained for.  By the end Jack and Kit come to an understanding and both have challenged their previously held beliefs.

 

 
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Posted by on March 10, 2011 in Booklists

 

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Celebrate African American History Month

 

Nonfiction

On Her Own Ground: The Life and Times of Madam C. J. Walker by A’Lelia Perry Bundles

Getting Away With Murder: the True Story of the Emmett Till Case by Chris Crowe

Ida B. Wells: Mother of the Civil Rights Movement by Dennis B. Fradin and Judith Bloom Fradin

Black Knights : the Story of the Tuskegee Airmen by Lynn M. Homan and Thomas Reilly

Claudette Colvin: Twice Toward Justice by Phillip House

We Beat the Streets: How a Friendship Pact Helped Us Succeed by Sampson Davis, George Jenkins and Rameck Hunt

Her Dream of Dreams: The Rise and Triumph of Madam C.J. Walker by Beverly Lowry

The Color of Water: A Black Man’s Tribute to His White Mother by James McBride

We Are the Ship: the Story of Negro League Baseball by Kadir Nelson

Dreams From My Father: A Story of Race and Inheritance by Barack Obama

Marching For Freedom: Walk Together Children and Don’t You Grow Weary by Elizabeth Partridge

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Kacks by Rebecca Skloot

Lift Every Voice: the NAACP and the making of the civil rights movement by Patricia Sullivan.

Remember Little Rock: the Time, the People, the Stories by Paul Robert Walker

Fiction

Zack by William Bell

Mississippi Trial, 1955 by Chris Crowe

Mare’s War by Tanita Davis

Copper Sun by Sharon Draper

The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman by Ernest Gaines

A Lesson Before Dying by Ernest Gaines

New Boy by Julian Houston

Letters from a Slave Girl: The Story of Harriet Jacobs by Mary E. Lyons

Sunrise over Fallujah by Walter Dean Myers

Hang a Thousand Trees with Ribbons: The Story of Phillis Wheatley by Ann Rinaldi

The Land by Mildred D. Taylor

Only Twice Have I Wished for Heaven by Dawn Turner Trice

After Tupac and D Foster by Jacqueline Woodson

 
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Posted by on February 11, 2010 in Booklists

 

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